The Power of Legumes

Legumes, or “pulses,” as the seeds of these plants are known, are nature’s own plant-based protein powerhouses. Simply put, if we’re going to eat lower on the food chain, legumes are an ideal source of the protein we need. They’re also high in iron, fiber and other important nutrients. But there’s still another reason to add more pulses to your diet: They taste delicious.

As good as legumes are for the human body, they are equally good for our planet. Not only do they make their own fertilizer by “fixing” atmospheric nitrogen and releasing it into the soil, they also provide the same benefit for other crops. Studies have shown that growing pulse crops helps soil support healthier, more diverse populations of beneficial microbes as well. And to top it all off, legumes use water from a shallower soil depth than many other crops, leaving more water for other crops.

Legumes, then, are the ultimate win-win crop: Good for people, good for the planet. Which is why we’re so excited about our soups built around pulses. Try our Black Bean and Green Lentil Soups and unleash the power of legumes.

Whole Grain Goodness

“A whole grain contains all of the components that are naturally present in the seed of a cereal grass plant, and thus contains all its inherent nutrients. And because grains are designed to support the growth of the seed when it sprouts, they’re a rich (and compact) source of nutrition for us, too.”


Margaret M. Wittenberg

Grains have long been used in traditional cuisine due to their excellent health benefits. The process of first steaming, then roasting whole grains (as we learned from our Sherpa friends) makes the nutrition more available to the human body, while significantly decreasing cooking time in the field. Four different organic whole grains combine with dried organic vegetables in our Tsampa Soup to create a nutty, wholesome soup mix that tastes—and makes us feel—so good, we eat it at home as much as we do on the trail.

Sourcing

Making delicious, satisfying soups starts with recipes we create and test with some of our favorite chefs. But in order to be considered truly good food, we need to make sure the sourcing of raw ingredients meets our own rigorous standards. Every whole grain, legume and vegetable in our soups must be 100% certified organic and non-GMO.

That’s just the beginning. We then dive into research to identify and work with farmers who share our environmental and social values. It’s not an easy process, but the result—a supply network of farmers committed to a healthier environment—is well worth the time and effort. We believe this is the only way to create food that’s truly good, in every sense of the word.